Seasonal Fishes 14: Buri/Yellowtail

BURI-1

As explained in a precedent posting on Kampachi we are just between two distinct seasons for Buri/鰤 or Yellowtail, as Hiramasa or young Yellowtail is caught in Summer and Buri/Mature Yellowtail is caught in Winter.

How do you recognize them apart?

BURI-AGO
Buri has a “square chin” as they say in Japanese. Look at the back extremity of the mouth,

BURI-HIRAMASA-AGO
whereas it is more rounded for the hiramasa.

In Japan they are caught south of Hokkaido Island.
They come under many names: Wakashi, Inada, Warasa, Wakana, Hamachi and Mejiro.

Buri/Yellowyail is most popular when caught in rising waters in Winter when called Kan Buri/寒鰤 or “Cold Yellowtail.

BURI-SASHIMI
Buri sashimi after light grill/Aburi/炙り

Young Yellowtails are best eaten as sahimi or

BURI-SUSHI-2
Buri Sushi

or as sushi as they are leaner then.

Older buri, cotaining a lot of fat, are better eaten cooked

BURI-TERIYAKI
Buri Teriyaki,

BURI-ARA
Buri Ara with the whole head, or

BURI-MOPPONZU
Buri Mopponzu, including innards, especially liver and heart.

In the West of Japan, a New Year Meal cannot be conceived without buri!

Natural Buri catch accounts for 70,000~80,000 tonnes, while human-raised buri accounts for over 130,000 tonnes every year.
Imported buri account for less than 3,000 tonnes.

4 thoughts on “Seasonal Fishes 14: Buri/Yellowtail”

  1. Kampachi skin has darker colour than Buri / Hiramasa / wakashi.
    Kampachi skin has greyish brownish metallic hue and its belly are not as white as Yellowtail buri / hiramasa / wakashi.

  2. Hi

    Out of curiosity , Is Aiburi ( black banded Amberjack) Seriola Nigrofasciata, commonly eaten in Japan , either as sashimi or cooked?

  3. dear Johan!
    Greetings!
    Aburi means seared!
    Now Yellowtail or “Buri” in Japanese is eaten in many ways: sashimi, lightly seared, simmered or in teriyaki! A very eclectic fish!

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Why may Shizuoka people be justified in assuming they eat some of the best in Japan?

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