Tag Archives: グルメ

Sushi Millefeuille: The Recipe (with Vegan Option)

Following the kind comments of the creators of such beautiful blogs as Gourmet Fury, Bread + Butter, Dhaleb, Reg And Mitzi, Island Vittles and many other friends, I thought the time was ripe to post a couple of simple but colorful sushi recipes than can be easily expanded for home parties and impress your guests!

My vegan and vegetarian friends should not worry as I have explained possible adaptations according to their priorities at the end of such postings!

Here is the second one:
Sushi Millefeuille!

INGREDIENTS (& ADVICE):

Once again need to be too precise about exact quantities here as personal tastes can (and ought to) be different!

First combination (see above picture):

-Sushi rice: as much as you will need (freshly made. See sushi rice recipe HERE)

-Fish: tuna for the red part
-Cucumbers: sliced very thin for the first green part under the tuna.
-Avocado: for the second green part under the tuna (choose ripe avocad)
-Tobikko: Flying fish roe for the topping (if unavailable, can be replaced with salmon roe or finely chopped sweet red pimento.
-Mayonnaise.
Now, if you don’t like it, make a thick dressing. The trick is to make a simple vinaigrette with a lot of soft Dijon mustrd which will give it consistency.
Mayonnaise sold over the counter can be cloying sweet. I would make my own, which is not difficult at all: one egg yolk + salt + pepper + vinegar.
Whisk them all until smooth. Add and whisk in olive oil little by little until you have enough. Point: all ingredients must be at room temperature!
I add some wasabi to it for extra taste!
-Thin leeks for decoration.

RECIPE:

-On a large enough individual serving plate place a large enough cake circle in the middle.

-Fill one quarter/third with sushi rice.

-Lay one layer of fine cucumber slices.

-Lay one layer of sliced ripe avocado.

-Lay one layer of sliced tuna.

-Fill to the brim with another layer of sushi rice and press.

-Top with a layer of tobikko/flying fish roe.

-Decorate with a couple of thin leeks, mayonnaise around the millefeuille and some tomatoes.

Second combination (see above picture):

-Sushi rice.

-Kanpachi/Amberjack (if not available use white fleshed raw fish such as sole, halibut, seabream, etc.)

-Herring roe/Kazu no Ko

-Cucumbers: sliced

-Dry bonito shavings/katsuo bushi

-Thin leeks: finely chopped.

-Mayonnaise

-Tobikko/Flying Fish roe or salmon roe

RECIPE:

-On a large enough individual serving plate place a large enough cake circle in the middle.

-Fill one quarter/third with sushi rice.

-Lay one layer of Kanpachi/Japanese Amberjack or white-fleshed fish.

-Lay one layer of kazu no Ko/herring roe.

-Lay one layer of sliced cucumbers.

-Fill to the brim with another layer of sushi rice and press.

-Top with a layer of Katsuo bushi/Dry bonito shavings and plenty of chopped leeks.

-Decorate with mayonnaise and tobikko around the millefeuille.

There are of course plenty of scope left for improvisation!

VEGAN OPTION:

-Skip the Tobikko/Flying Fish roe. Replace with very finely chopped sweet red pimento.

-As for the mayonnaise, use a vegan subsititute or make a dressing like I suggested above.

-Instead of fish use layers made of cooked carrot or kabocha.
Grilled, peeled and cooled down sweet red pimento also make for great taste and colourful grading.

Naturally boiled and cut to practicality brocoli, asparaguses, violet sweet potatoes and so forth can be combined into a colourful creation!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow
Wild River Review
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Maison de Christina
Chrys Niles
Comestilblog
Greedy Girl
Bouchon For 2
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First Visit of the Year at Sushi Ko, Shizuoka

Last night we paid our first visit to our favourite sushi restarant in Shizuoka City, namely Sushi Ko!
Sushi Ko might not be the most expensive or sophisticated sushi restaurant in our Prefecture but you get the best food at the best price there.
It certainly makes for far better value than some vaunted establishments in Tokyo or New York where you pay ridiculous prices for tiny pieces of art in outrageously expensive surroundings!
Moreover, Mr. Oda is one of those very few true chefs who take pleasure in tackling any challenge thrown at him by customers.
Owning a website of his own and knowing I’m more than amenable with his taking pictures of the food I order, we have this great deal of being offered even better presentation!
When it comes to sashimi, Mr. Oda always makes a point to introduce the seasonal fish of the day on a separate board for all to see, meaning that they will not be always available as contrary to the other possible orders written (with their prices!) on small wooden boards hung on the wall above the counter.

There were too many fish to choose from, but the help of Mr. Oda, we chose the following:

Above: Meji maguro Akami/Lean part.
Bottom: Aori Ika/Bigfin Reef Squid.
Can you see the freshly grated Shizuoka wasabi shaped into a green leaf?

Above: Ooma Honmaguro/Ble Fin Tuna from Ooma in Aomori Prefecture, O-toro
Below: the same, chu-toro.
The chrysanthemum is edible.

Above: Meji maguro o-toro
Below: Kinmeidai/Seabream/Great Alfonsino from Izu Penisula in Shizuoka Prefecture.

Actually this was our second restaurant of the night!
Therefore we ordered more the indivual morsel than the quantity.
The sushi nigiri above is tachiuo aburi/half grilled scabbard fish served with ponzu and momijioroshi.

The fish was so fresh that we were offered its bones deep-fried! Great snack!

The Missus had to order (she does every time!) the Spicy scallops sushi roll!

As I said above, Mr. Oda is one of those very few true chefs who take pleasure in tackling any challenge thrown at him by customers.
He knows that I will always ask him to come with a vegan sushi plate not only to demonstrate that such gastronomy exists, but also to lure more customers to his business, which is quite flourishing.

Here what he concocted for us. Sorry for the slightly fuzzy pictures, but I had to contend with an impatient Missus!

These rolls were made with thin wide strips of daikon that mr. Oda quickly marinated in lemon water instead of using dry nori/seaweed.
Inside he rolled sushi rice (shari) with trefoil stems, umeboshi/pickled Japanese plum meat and shiso/perilla leaves!

Buckwheat sprouts/Hime Soba Me/姫蕎麦芽 Nigiri!

Thin leek sprouts/Me Negi/芽葱 Nigiri!

Trefoil/Mitsuba/三つ葉 Nigiri!

As for the last dish, we both have our habits.
I had tamagoyaki/Japanese Omelette,

And the Missus had her mini ikura/salmon roe and shake/salmon oyako/parent and child mini-donburi!

Looking forward to the next visit!

Sushi Ko
shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Ryogae-cho. 2-3-1 (Aoba Koen)
Tel.: 054-2512898
Business Hours: 17:00~25:00. 17:00~23:00 (Sundays)
Closed on Wednesdays
Reservations recommended
Credit cards OK
HOMEPAGE (Japanese)

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Greedy Girl
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Seasonal Fishes 1: Noresore/Conger Eel Whitebait (expanded)

noresore4.jpg

“Noresore” will soon appear at some select fish markets, and as it will be a very short season, you will have to keep your eyes open!
Noresore stands for very young conger eels. They are called different names depending on regions: “Berada” in Okayama Pref., “Tachikurage” in Misaki, “Nagatankurage” in Wakayama Pref.
In Shizuoka, they mainly come from Hamana Lake, a seawater lake west of the Prefecture, famous for its oysters, eels and clams.

5~6cm long, they are practically transparent, save for their eyes. They emit no smell. In our Prefecture they are available only during the first two weeks of March. They are slowly but surely becoming a rarity wherever in Japan, and people come from afar just for the experience!

Before serving them, lightly wash them in clean salted water.
They are great as they are with a little “ponzu or “yuzu” vinegar, a dash of “momijioroshi” (freshly grated daikon and chili pepper) and some chopped thin leeks for a last touch of colour!

Now as sushi they are sublime as “gunkan”, or a rice ball wrapped in seaweed if you are an expert, with freshly grated ginger and chopped thin leeks again.

They can even been cooked (very quickly!) in garlic olive oil!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
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Frank Fariello
Elinluv Tidbit Corner
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Comestilblog
Greedy Girl
Bouchon For 2
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Japanese Seasonal Fish 18: Tai-Madai/Seabream

There are many varieties of Seabream/Snappers/Tai/鯛in Japan:
Batodai, Hanadai, Ishidai, Kinmeidai, Mekkidai, etc., but the most popular variety is called Madai/真鯛, or True Seabream.

Even Madai/True Seabream is called different names depending upon the region: Oodai or Hondai.
The best season streches from Winter to Spring.
It is extensively raised by humans in Ehime, Mie and Saga Prefectures.
Wild specimen are mainly caught off the shores of Nagasaki, Fukuok, Kumamoto, and Yamaguchi Prefectures. Not so many Madai are caught in Shizuoka but other varieties are abundant especially around Izu Penisula.

Human-raised amount to over 80,000 tonnes a year wild ones are caught at a rate inferior to 15,000 tonnes a year.
Imports are relatively and account for only about 6.500 tonnes a year.

Madai is widely appreciated raw as sashimi in the Japanese style (above),

in carpaccio, Italian-style sashimi!

The Japanese also ove them grilled or steamed.

The Japanese since immemorial times have preserved the raw fish in rice miso, mirin/sweet sake and konbu/seaweed, but this has become quite an expensive morsel these days!

(Only relatively) lesser varieties, like Kinmedai, are appreciated as Himono/naturally dried fish, a specilaty of Shizuoka Prefecture which produces no less half of all naturally dried fish in Japan! Actually they come almost as expensive!

Konbujime/marinated in seaweed nigiri sushi

As sushi, madai (and other seabreams) are very versatile.
You will encounter them, depending on the region as konbujime/marinated in seaweed (above),

simple, straight nigiri sushi,

oshizushi/pressed sushi,

or zuke/marinated in ponzu, sake, mirin, etc.,

Seabream certainly looks great as temarizushi/Kyoto-style small round sushi nigiri!

Tai Shirako

Like tara/cod, their sperm sacs of the male specimens are highly appreciated and even more expensive than those of cods.

You can have served raw/slightly boiled or grilled as above,

meuniere-style as in French or Italian cuisine,

or on gunkan sushi nigiri!

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Greedy Girl
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Sushi Recipes: Spicy Scallops Sushi Roll (with Vegan Option)

Following the kind comments of the creators of such beautiful blogs as Gourmet Fury, Bread + Butter, Dhaleb, Reg And Mitzi, and many other friends, I thought the time was ripe to post a couple of simple but colorful sushi recipes than can be easily expanded for home parties and impress your guests!

My vegan and vegetarian friends should not worry as I have explined possible adaptations according to their priorities at the end of such postings!

Here is the first one:
Spicy Scallops Sushi Roll!

INGREDIENTS (& ADVICE):

No need to be too precise about exact quantities here as personal tastes can (and ought to) be different!

-Sushi rice: as much as you will need (freshly made. See sushi rice recipe HERE)

-Nori/dry seaweed: use large sheets (maximum size)

-Scallops: Only fresh, please.

-Tobikko (Flying Fish roe): as fresh as possible.

-Tempura kasu: these are the pieces of batter found in the oil after frying tenpura. The Japanese do not throw them away! Scoop them out as early as possible and lay them on a piece of paper kitchen to take off excess oil. Let them cool completely. If you do use them immediately, store them by dee-freezing them inside an airtight vinyl pouch!

-Coarsely cruched peanuts. These with the tenpura kasu will add a welcome crunchiness.

-Mayonnaise.
Now, if you don’t like it, make a thick dressing. The trick is to make a simple vinaigrette with a lot of soft Dijon mustrd which will give it consistency.
Mayonnaise sold over the counter can cloying sweet. I would make my own, which is not difficult at all: one egg yolk + salt + pepper + vinegar.
Whisk them all until smooth. Add and whisk in olive oil little by little until you have enough. Point: all ingredients must be at room temperature!
I add some wasabi to it for extra taste!

-Chili pepper powder.

-Cucumber: finely chopped. Cut the cucumber in 5 cm, 2-inch long pieces. Cut each piece into thin slices. Cut the slices again into very fine strips.

RECIPE:

-In a bowl drop the scallops cut into small pieces. Add the tobikko/Flyiing Fish roe, tempura kasu, crushed peanuts, mayonnaise and chili pepper. Mix well. Taste and rectify the seasoning if needed.

-Spread a large sushi roll mat out and cover it with a sheet of nori/dry seaweed.

-Spread a layer of sushi rice over the whole nori/dry seaweed as equally as possible. Careful with the quantity. Too much and you won’t be able to roll it!

-Leave a small strip space at one extremity. Line with the cucumber in a half centimetre/less than half an inch wide strip.

-Leave a space between the cucumber and scallops mixture to obtain the same pattern as shown in above picture. Spread the scallops evenly. Leave a space at the other extremity to allow for a tight closing of the roll.

-Carefully roll the sushi from the cucmber end. Once completely rolled, pressed gently and evenly so as to allow the nori/seaweed to seal the roll.

-Unroll the mat. Cut the roll and serve at once.

-There is no real need for extra soy sauce or whatever dessing, but this a personal taste.

VEGAN OPTION:

-Skip the Tobikko/Flying Fish roe. Replace with very finely chopped sweet red pimento.

-Instead of using scallops, use mushrooms. White coloured and soft varieties such as button mushrooms, shimeji or even eringi are best.
Cut the mushrooms and sprinkle with lemon juice to prevent them from darkening.
Fry them in olive oil until they are soft.
Let them cool completely and drain them thoroughly.
Do not throw the juices away as they can be used in delicious sauces or soups.

-As for the mayonnaise, use a vegan subsititute or make a dressing like I suggested above.

NOTES:

Do not be afraid of varying that recipe. It is very simple!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow
Wild River Review
Bread + Butter
5 Star Foodie
Frank Fariello
Elinluv Tidbit Corner
Tokyo Terrace
Maison de Christina
Chrys Niles
Comestilblog
Greedy Girl
Bouchon For 2
Sushi Nomads

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Sushi Recipes: Spam California Roll

Back into spam!
Bazooka Gourmet is going to kill for that one!LOL
Making the most of simple ingredients to create that ever popular Clifornai Roll!

INGREDIENTS:

-Sapm: 1 can
-Eggs: 2
-Avocado: 1 (ripe)
-Nori/dry seaweed (as much as needed)
-Sesame seeds (as much as needed)
-Mayonnaise (as much as needed)
-Rice: 2 large bowls (freshly made. See sushi rice recipe HERE)
-Salt, pepper: to taste

RECIPE:

-Cut spam into strips and fry.

-Prepare the eggs as tamagoyaki/Japanese omelette and cut as shown in above picture. Check HERE for basic Tamagoyaki recipe!

-Cut avocado as in above picture and let them for a while in some water added with lemon juice. This will prevent the avocado turning brown.

-First spread a sheet of cellophane paper over a sushi roll mat. Then spread sushi rice over it evenly and not too thickly!.

-Spread dry seaweed sheets over the rice.

-Place the sapm, tamgoyaki and avocado as shown in above picture at some distance from the extremity. Line with some mayonnaise.
Point: mix some grated wasabi with the mayonnaise first!

-Roll your Californai roll.
Unwrap and sprinkle it sesame seeds as shown in above picture.

-Cut and serve!

NOTES:

-The rice can be simple slightly salted steamed rice instead of the sushi rice.
-Tamagoyaki can be made in thin wide omelette you will roll first before lining the California roll with it.
-Let your imagination go free if you want to replace the sesame seeds with something else!

Easy, isn’t it?

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
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Sushi Nomads

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Seasonal Fish 17: Tara/Cod

Cod, or “Tara/鱈” in Japanese reads a the “Snow Fish”. Unlike in many countries in Europe and North America, the fish is eaten fresh, raw or cooked in Japan, but practically never salted.
Only the Norwegians can boast a difference as they eat the tongue of the fish as soon as they catch it!

As other fish in Japan, it is called different names: Ibodara, Maidara (Toyama Prefecture), Ara (Nagasaki Prefecture) as far as “Madar” or “True Cod” is concerned.
There are other varieties as is shown below in sushi pictures.

It is mainly caught in the Sea of Okhotsk in Winter.
The average total Cod catch is 437,000 tonnes, 55.000 of which is “True Cod”. Imports average annualy 152,000 tonnes mainly from the US and Russia.

Cod sashimi with its male sperm sacs/Shirako

It makes for great sashimi.

But it is also equally appreciated cooked, especially grilled or in “Nabe/Japanese-style pot au feu”.

Gintara/銀鱈 Cod variety as sushi nigiri.

Higetara/髭鱈 Cod variety as sushi nigiri.

Madara/真鱈 Cod as sushi nigiri.

As shown above, many varieties of tara are greatly appreciated as sushi, especially nigiri.

Shirako/白子, or the sperm sacs of the male fish, is an extremely popular delicay in Japan.
It is either served raw or lightly boiled as in above picture with ponzu, chopped leeks and momijioroshi/grated daikon with chili pepper.

Shirako is also very popular served as sushi in gunkan shape as above.

It becomes another delicacy when grilled.
French and Italian Restaurants in Japan also extensively use it sauteed or in gratin!

The roe sacs of the femal fish is also a very popular (and expensive) delicacy especially when preserved in chili pepper (as above) and sold as Mentaiko/明太子!

The same roe is also served as “Tarako/鱈子”, especially in the sushi gunkan form!

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Sashimi Mini Plate at Tomii (’10/01/09)

This is the second part of my “Quick fix” last night at Tomii.
I posted this article separately as it will also go to my sushi blog page and Sushi Nomads Website.

All the fish served on this “min sashimi plate” are seasonal (as always at Tomii).

Left top: “Honmaguro Akami”, or lean part of bluefin tuna backed with various sprout vegetables.
Right top: “Hirame” or sole on a leaf of shiso/perilla.
Left bottom: “Tai”, or seabream. In thei case “Madai”, or true seabream.
Right bottom: “Aori Ika”, or bigfin reef squid.
The wasabi is naturally freshly grated wasabi from Shizuoka!

TOMII
Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Tokiwa-cho, 1-2-7, Tomii Bldg, 1F
Tel.: 054-274-0666
Business hours: 17:00~22:00
Closed on Sundays
HOMEPAGE (Japanese)

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Vegan Sushi Recipe Suggestions 1: Myoga/Myoga Ginger

I already have introduced Vegan and Vegetarian Sushi, but following further requests and questions by my vegan (I’m not!) friends, I decided to contribute a small series of postings to give them more detailed suggestions and ideas!

Now, please check sushi rice recipe HERE to make things more practical!

The first vegetable amenable to sushi I would like to introduce is Myoga, or Myoga Ginger.

Please check Myoga HERE on Wikipedia!

Myoga is a very interesting vegetable as not only the shoots but also the flowers are edible!

The flower in its natural state!

As bought at the market.

Interestingly enough, as Japan makes an enormous consumption of them it has to import a lot from New Zealand and Australia. I’m sure you can buy it at local Asian markets. It could porve an interesting cultivation for some, too!

Myoga sushi roll.

Now there are two basic ways of presenting myoga as sushi.
First, as shown on above picture, as a roll.
It doesn’t have to be complicated. Just chop the myoga in strips and fill the roll with it accompanied by some wasabi.

Myoga Sushi nigiri.

The other basic way is present it as sushi nigiri on top of a small ball of sushi rice previously smeared with a little wasabi.

You can prepare the myoga in two basic ways,too:
The first one would would be just to wash it and use it raw.
The second would be to pickle it in rice vinegar and sugar for a while, press it and serve it in both sushi styles as explained above.

There are other interesting possibilities when you let your imagination go free as in above picture where the rice is replaced with a small cube of tofu and the topping is made with chopped myoga, tofu and wasabi all mixed together!

To further convince you, look at the picture above:
All vegan sushi:
from top down: Cucumber, egg plant/aubergine and myoga. The last are pickled daikon!

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Russell 3

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New Year Sashimi Sets at Supermarkets in Shizuoka

Tradition has been changed or made with altogether!
From this year, the main supermarkets were oprn on New Year’s Day in Shizuoka.
Economic crisis? Cutthroat competition with “Convenience Stores”?
The result is that you don’t to worry any more about stocking up foood for the long Japanese New Year Holidays!

Not only the Shizutetsu Chain Supermarkets were open, but they had advertized bargains well in advance.
One concerned sashimi.
I just couldn’t ignore it and visited the largest store near my home yesterday afternoon.
I noticed that I had messed with my mobile phone camera today when I noticed the dates printed on the pics. I never do so, but at least, it will serve as a proof that I reaaly the pics yesterday! LOL

As you can see on the above pic there was plenty to choose from.
The main particularity was that the tuna was all wild tuna (Shizutetsu has a direct delivery deal with the various harbours in the Prefecture!)

The set above is priced at about 25US$ and included sashimi from 3 different tuna: honmaguro, tonbomaguro and bachimaguro, from akami to chu-toro.

The above set for about 50US$ is a bit extravagant, athough very cheap (dead cheap abroad, I suppose!) and included three types of maguro/tuna, one tai/seabream, one madai/true seabream, one tako/octopus, one hirame/sole, one ika/cuttlefish, one buri/yellowtail, amaebi/sweet shrimps, hotate/scallops and one shake/salmon!

This is the one I chose for both of us (25US$)!

Top from left to right:
Honbomagurao Chutoro, Surumeika/Cuttlefish, Amaebi/Sweet Shrimps and Bachimaguro Chutoro
Bottom from left to right:
Hirame/Sole, Bachimaguro Chutoro, Buri/Yellowtail, and Hotate/ Scallops.

Of course I had Sake from Shizuoka with that lot!

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Oshizushi/Pressed Sushi Techniques 4: Seabred Sebream/Tai no Aburi

SYNOPSIS:

Sushi exists under many forms and guises.
It is not all nigiri and (more ubiquitous) sushi rolls!
Have you ever heard of Oshizushi?

Oshizushi (押し寿司, litterally pressed sushi), is a pressed sushi from the Kansai Region, a favourite and specialty of Osaka.

Oshibako unmounted

It is made with the help of a block-shaped piece formed using a wooden mold, called an oshibako/押し箱.

Oshibako lined with toppings

The chef lines the bottom of the oshibako with the toppings, covers them with sushi rice, and then presses the lid of the mold down to create a compact, rectilinear block.

Cutting Grilled Eel Oshizushi

The block is then removed from the mold and then cut into bite-sized pieces.

It is great fun to experiment at home for large parties or the family as you can include almost anything.
Moreover, oshizuhi is easy to transport and include in bento!

The recipes and techniques I’m introducing here are professional, but with a little practice I’m sure you will become a specialist

1)Salmon Marinated in Seaweed/Sake Sushi Konbushime, 2) Seared Prime Beef/Gyuniku Aburi, 3) Egg Bearing Snow Crab/Seikogani

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Seabreams or Snappers come in so many varieties all over thw orld that it becomes quite easy to find and adapt to various cuisines.
The Japanese are extremely fond of it either raw or steamed with rice.
When using it as sashimi or sushi, choose a fresh fis. Look at their eyes and press with fingers. And use your nose!

Madai/真鯛 or “True Seabream”, the most commonly used type of seabream in Japan.

For an extra finishing touch for the taste, use fresh leaves of sansho/山椒 or Japanese pepper (also called ki no me/木の芽).
The English name is Shichuan Pepper, although we are talking of the fresh plant here.

In Japan the dried and powdered leaves of Zanthoxylum sancho are used to make noodle dishes and soups mildly hot and fragrant. The whole fresh leaves, 木の芽 kinome, are used to flavour vegetables, especially bamboo shoots, and to decorate soups. Typically the young shoots are used in this way giving an aromatic lemony flavour to food. They are used to denote spring seasonality in food. The buds, seeds, flowers, and hulls are also used.

Chop some leaves finely enough to use with sushi, but not to fine. Cut them as short as shown in picture.

Soften light seaweed in lukewarm water and spread it over a clean cloth.

Line the bottom of the oshibako/box with slices of seabream fillet as tightly to each other as possible.
Sprinkle with chopped sansho leaves.
Fill with sushi rice and press.

Unloose oshizushi out of the box.
Brush the surface lightly with some soy sauce (I sweeten it a bit by mixing it with a little mirin/sweet sake).
Sear the fish lightly.
Repeat the same process twice more so as to cook only the surface and make it take a nice colour.
This way you will be able to taste the fish in two different ways inside your mouth!

Spread the light seaweed over the top.
Cut to size and serve immediately for maximum enjoyment!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow
Wild River Review
Bread + Butter
5 Star Foodie
Frank Fariello
Elinluv Tidbit Corner
Tokyo Terrace
Maison de Christina
Chrys Niles
Comestilblog
Greedy Girl
Bouchon For 2

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Oshizushi/Pressed Sushi Techniques 3: Egg Bearing Snow Crab/Seikogani

SYNOPSIS:

Sushi exists under many forms and guises.
It is not all nigiri and (more ubiquitous) sushi rolls!
Have you ever heard of Oshizushi?

Oshizushi (押し寿司, litterally pressed sushi), is a pressed sushi from the Kansai Region, a favourite and specialty of Osaka.

Oshibako unmounted

It is made with the help of a block-shaped piece formed using a wooden mold, called an oshibako/押し箱.

Oshibako lined with toppings

The chef lines the bottom of the oshibako with the toppings, covers them with sushi rice, and then presses the lid of the mold down to create a compact, rectilinear block.

Cutting Grilled Eel Oshizushi

The block is then removed from the mold and then cut into bite-sized pieces.

It is great fun to experiment at home for large parties or the family as you can include almost anything.
Moreover, oshizuhi is easy to transport and include in bento!

The recipes and techniques I’m introducing here are professional, but with a little practice I’m sure you will become a specialist

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Egg Bearing Snow Crab/Seikogani

Snow Crab/Zuwagani

Seikogani is the Japanese name for the female Snow Crab or Zuwagani, when she is bearing her eggs.
Contrary to many other kinds of crabs, the female snow crabs, even when bearing eggs, lose little of their food and taste quality with the added advantage of an extra delicacy and taste. On the other hand the main food is found inside the shell instead of the legs and pincers for the males.
Therefore, if you get your hands on such a specimen, do not ignore it, even if they are noticeably smaller than their male counterparts!

Boiled snow crabs.

The best is actually to combine both male and female into a combination sushi.

Above are the shells of two snow crabs, the large male one containing white flesh and red brains from both male and female, the smaller female one containing the eggs, and the flesh taken out of the male legs after boiling and cooling.

See above picture for better view of the edible morsels: white flesh, red brains (don’t forget these!) and eggs.

As there is a danger of a general crumbling out of the ingredients, line the bottom of the oshibako/box with a good layer of light seaweed first instead of doing it after you have unloose the sushi out ofits box.
Then place legs flesh tightly parallel to each other to form as compact as possible layer. Cover the leg flesh with the eggs and red brains into a pleasing design.
Finally fill with sushi rice and press.

Unloose sushi from its box and cut to size before serving!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow
Wild River Review
Bread + Butter
5 Star Foodie
Frank Fariello
Elinluv Tidbit Corner
Tokyo Terrace
Maison de Christina
Chrys Niles
Comestilblog
Greedy Girl
Bouchon For 2

Please check the new postings at:
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Oshizushi/Pressed Sushi Techniques 2: Seared Prime Beef/Gyuniku Aburi

SYNOPSIS:

Sushi exists under many forms and guises.
It is not all nigiri and (more ubiquitous) sushi rolls!
Have you ever heard of Oshizushi?

Oshizushi (押し寿司, litterally pressed sushi), is a pressed sushi from the Kansai Region, a favourite and specialty of Osaka.

Oshibako unmounted

It is made with the help of a block-shaped piece formed using a wooden mold, called an oshibako/押し箱.

Oshibako lined with toppings

The chef lines the bottom of the oshibako with the toppings, covers them with sushi rice, and then presses the lid of the mold down to create a compact, rectilinear block.

Cutting Grilled Eel Oshizushi

The block is then removed from the mold and then cut into bite-sized pieces.

It is great fun to experiment at home for large parties or the family as you can include almost anything.
Moreover, oshizuhi is easy to transport and include in bento!

The recipes and techniques I’m introducing here are professional, but with a little practice I’m sure you will become a specialist

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Seared Prime Beef/Gyuniku Aburi

Japanese prime beef has become a registered trademark all over the world be it from Kobe or other regions.
The present sushi was made with “Kuroge Gyuniku/黒毛牛肉/Black Hair Beef from animals raised to the age of 12 months in Fukui Prefecture.
Do check the origin of your beef!

When preparing this slightly extravagant sushi, choose a large slice of prime beef with plenty of “fat veins” as shown on the above picture.
Don’t choose too thick or too thin, either. Think of the proportion of the beef and rice. Bear in mind that the the seared beef will also loose some of its thickness.

Sprinkle the beef with quality ground balck pepper and salt.
Sear it or grill it lightly on both sides quickly.
This process will enhance the sweetness of the meat.

-Slice the meat into bite-sized portions as shown in above picture at a slant after having cut off the fatty extremity.

Lay the bottom of the oshibako/box with slices of beef as shown in above picture in a “staggering” fashion. If you don’t, the slices will slideaway from each other.
Cover with shiso/perilla leaves.
Cover with sushi rice and press.

Soften light seaweed in lukewarm water and spread it over a clean cloth.
Unloose the sushi out of its box.
The beef should be on top.
Spread the light seaweed over the top.
Cut to size and serve immediately for maximum enjoyment!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow
Wild River Review
Bread + Butter
5 Star Foodie
Frank Fariello
Elinluv Tidbit Corner
Tokyo Terrace
Maison de Christina
Chrys Niles
Comestilblog
Greedy Girl
Bouchon For 2

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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Oshizushi/Pressed Sushi Techniques 1: Salmon Marinated in Seaweed/Sake Sushi Konbushime

Sushi exists under many forms and guises.
It not all nigiri and (more ubiquitous) sushi rolls!
Have you ever heard of Oshizushi?

Oshizushi (押し寿司, litterally pressed sushi), is a pressed sushi from the Kansai Region, a favourite and specialty of Osaka.

Oshibako unmounted

It is made with the help of a block-shaped piece formed using a wooden mold, called an oshibako/押し箱.

Oshibako lined with toppings

The chef lines the bottom of the oshibako with the toppings, covers them with sushi rice, and then presses the lid of the mold down to create a compact, rectilinear block.

Cutting Grilled Eel Oshizushi

The block is then removed from the mold and then cut into bite-sized pieces.

It is great fun to experiment at home for large parties or the family as you can include almost anything.
Moreover, oshizuhi is easy to transport and include in bento!

The recipes and techniques I’m introducing here are professional, but with a little practice I’m sure you will become a specialist

——————————

Oshizushi/Pressed Sushi Techniques 1: Salmon Marinated in Seaweed/Sake Sushi Konbushime

For sushi rice preparation, check HERE for previous posting!

Konbushime/昆布〆means that the fish is “marinated with seaweed.

Konbu/Seaweed is now readily available on Japanese and Asian markets all over the world or on the internet.

Two types of konbu/seaweed are used:
-Dark/black thick Konbu/Seaweed is bought dry and has to be softened in lukewarm water for a while. That particular step is very easy to learn.
Keep in mind it is edible, although after marination, it should be discarded.

-Thin, light coloured (almost transparent) is used as an ingredient both for taste and the finishing touch. If not available, you may replace it with fine green leaves.
It is called “Kagome Konbu/かごめ昆布”.

An even better light seaweed is called “Take Kawa Konbu/竹皮昆布/Bamboo Skin Saweed” and is widely used by professionals.

Both light coloured seaweeds have to be softened in lukewarm water, sponged off and spread into thin sheets first. But it is really worth the work!

After having softened the dark konbu, spread it over a clean working table and place the fresh (fresh, please!) salmon slices over one sheet and covering the lot with another sheet.
Wrap it in cellophane paper and leave it in the fridge for at least 30 minutes.

During that time soften light seaweed in lukewarm water and spread it over a clean cloth.

Line the bottom of the oshibako/box with one layer of salmon (no dark seaweed!). Spread light seaweed over the salmon and spread a first layer sushi rice.

Repeat the same operation once more and press.

Unloose the sushi out of its box.
The fish should be on top.
Grill the top of the fish lightly with a hand burner just enough to change the colour.
That step will enable to savour two different tastes at the same time!

Place very thin slices of lemon (clean organic, please!) on top of the rice.
It will abate the “fishy smell/taste”.

Lay another layer of fine light seaweed over the top.
Cut and serve!

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow
Wild River Review
Bread + Butter
5 Star Foodie
Frank Fariello
Elinluv Tidbit Corner
Tokyo Terrace
Maison de Christina
Chrys Niles
Comestilblog
Greedy Girl
Bouchon For 2

Please check the new postings at:
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Sashimi Mini-Plate for Christmas at Tomii!

The agnostic I am have little to do with Christmas and the New Year, except wishing for great ones to all and sundry.
Actually I worked both on the 24th and 25th (and will on the 26th).
Last night on my way back from University I was really starving (diet consequence as I’m already 5 kg lighter than in September!) and I had to store something into that body of mine.
A quick trip to Tomii was in order.

I managed to keep my hunger in check and asked for a small plate (I mean, a really small one) of sashimi.
Tomii gladly obliged and served me the following (see above picture)*

In thebackground, Kan Buri/寒鰤 or Japanese Amberjack/Five-ray Yellowtail ona bed of leaf spouts and a sprig of shiso/紫蘇 perilla flowers.

In front Honmaguro/本鮪 orBlue Fin Tuna O-toro (Belly fat part) and Akami (lean part) and Hirame/平目 or Sole/Flounder.

The colours of the fish are very reminsicent of Santa Claus, don’t you think? LOL

TOMII
Shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Tokiwa-cho, 1-2-7, Tomii Bldg, 1F
Tel.: 054-274-0666
Business hours: 17:00~22:00
Closed on Sundays
HOMEPAGE (Japanese)

RECOMMENDED RELATED SITES:
Warren Bobrow
Wild River Review
Bread + Butter
5 Star Foodie
Frank Fariello
Elinluv Tidbit Corner
Tokyo Terrace
Maison de Christina
Chrys Niles
Comestilblog
Greedy Girl
Bouchon For 2

Please check the new postings at:
sake, shochu and sushi

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