Tag Archives: Fish species

Seasonal Fishes 15: Sake/Salmon


The Japan Blog List

Please check Shizuoka Gourmet Blog for all the gastronomy in Shizuoka Prefecture!

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SAKE-1

Salmon is a favourite almost everywhere on the Globe, but it is in Japan that you can enjoy in the most numerous manners!

Like every other fish it has many names according to season and place:
Shirozake/White Salmon, Akiaji or Akizake for Autumn Salmon, Shake in Tokyo.
In Spring it is called Tokishirazu.
I don’t have to tell you there are many, many names for it all over the world!

SAKE-SUJIKO

Its roe, before processing, is called Sujiko in Japanese, whereas the salmon roe, once treated, is called Ikura.

SAKE-ROE-SUSHI

Many Japanese appreciate the roe untreated, but more people enjoy it on top of rice as it is with some soy sauce and grated wasabi.

SAKE-SUSHI

It also makes for some splendid colourful creation on a plate of sushi!

SAKE-SUSHI-2

As oshizushi/pressed sushi, it can make some very interesting combinations with the salmon flesh and roe.

SAKE-GOHAN

Have you ever tasted Sake Gohan/Salmon Rice?

SAKE-OSHIZUSHI

Slightly smoked the Japanese way, It is extensively used in the making of bentoes!

Seasonal Fishes 14: Buri/Yellowtail


The Japan Blog List

Please check Shizuoka Gourmet Blog for all the gastronomy in Shizuoka Prefecture!

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BURI-1

As explained in a precedent posting on Kampachi we are just between two distinct seasons for Buri/鰤 or Yellowtail, as Hiramasa or young Yellowtail is caught in Summer and Buri/Mature Yellowtail is caught in Winter.

How do you recognize them apart?

BURI-AGO
Buri has a “square chin” as they say in Japanese. Look at the back extremity of the mouth,

BURI-HIRAMASA-AGO
whereas it is more rounded for the hiramasa.

In Japan they are caught south of Hokkaido Island.
They come under many names: Wakashi, Inada, Warasa, Wakana, Hamachi and Mejiro.

Buri/Yellowyail is most popular when caught in rising waters in Winter when called Kan Buri/寒鰤 or “Cold Yellowtail.

BURI-SASHIMI
Buri sashimi after light grill/Aburi/炙り

Young Yellowtails are best eaten as sahimi or

BURI-SUSHI-2
Buri Sushi

or as sushi as they are leaner then.

Older buri, cotaining a lot of fat, are better eaten cooked

BURI-TERIYAKI
Buri Teriyaki,

BURI-ARA
Buri Ara with the whole head, or

BURI-MOPPONZU
Buri Mopponzu, including innards, especially liver and heart.

In the West of Japan, a New Year Meal cannot be conceived without buri!

Natural Buri catch accounts for 70,000~80,000 tonnes, while human-raised buri accounts for over 130,000 tonnes every year.
Imported buri account for less than 3,000 tonnes.

Seasonal Fishes 13: Kampachi/Amberjack


The Japan Blog List

Please check Shizuoka Gourmet Blog for all the gastronomy in Shizuoka Prefecture!

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KAMPACHI-1

With the first days of Autumn upon us, Kampachi or Amberjack is appearing on our plates in Japan!

The fish seems to have so many names in any language: Amberjack, Purplish Amberjack, Yellowtail, Greater Yellowtail, and Ruderfish in English, whereas in Japanese it is called Kampachi, Akahana, Kampa, or Shokko among others, not accounting for regional names!.

KAMPACHI-3

It is caught along Central and South Honshu Island, including a lot in Suruga Bay in Shizuoka Prefecture!
It is a very popular fish as it happens to come just in between Hiramasa/Young Japanese Amberjack-Five ray Yellowtail in Summer and Buri/Mature Japanese Amberjack-Five Ray Yellowtail in Winter, making a favourite for the season, but bringinga lot of confusion on foreign tables because of the similar names.
Kampachi (Seriola dumerili (Risso) in Latin) and Buri (Seriola quinqueradiata Temminck and Schlegel in Latin) are very similar but their season is different. Beware of scams! Actually the meat looks different.

KAMPACHI-2BURI-SUSHI
Kampachi vs Buri Sushi

Natural Kampachi is quite rare in Japan these days whereas human-raised are plenty.

Kampachi is savoured in many ways: Sashimi & Sushi, Grilled (Yakimono), Simmered (Nizuke), Meuniere and fried.
Choose comparatibely small specimens. Beware of the large cheap specimens!
Ask for a variation in Sushi called “Kampachi Aburi”?kampachi lightly grilled on one side: a beauty!

Seasonal Fish 12: Shirogisu/Sillago


The Japan Blog List

Please check Shizuoka Gourmet Blog for all the gastronomy in Shizuoka Prefecture!

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SILLAGO-SHIROGISU

Shirogisu, or Sillago in English probably has as many Japanese names as English names.
The Sillago found along the Japanese shore is also called sillago japonica, Whiting or Smelt-Whiting in english, Shirogisu, Kisu, Magisu and Kisugo in Japanese.

The best specimen in Japan are caught in Fukuoka (Kyushu) and Ehime (Shikoku) prefectures from Spring to Summer.

SILLAGO-SASHIMI
Shirogisu sashimi

The greatest part of the sillago catch comes from Indonesia, Korea, Thailand, China and other Asian countries.
Fortunately, here in Shizuoka, we do catch a sizeable amount in Suruga Bay guaranting fresheness in season.

SILLAGO-SUSHI
Shirogisu Sushi

If absolutely fresh, shirohisu/sillago makes for an interesting moresl, the more for it as it is quite rare in this form.

SILLAGO-TEMPURA
Sillago Tempura

The most popular way of savouring it is as tempura or breaded and deep-fried, although the fish taste will vary greatly with freshness!

Seasonal Fishes 7/2: Kawahagi/Thread-sail Filefish


The Japan Blog List

Please check Shizuoka Gourmet Blog for all the gastronomy in Shizuoka Prefecture!

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Last Thursday, as I had to atone for some somewhat egoistical pleasure-seeking, I took the Missus to our favourite Sushi Restaurant in Shizuoka City, namely Sushi Ko,located along Aoba Park.

Although we did order the inevitable favourites, “katsuo/bonito” sashimi, “Shirako to Ankimo/Combination of Cod Sperm sacs and Frogfish/Monkfish liver”, “Pon Kara Maguro/Deep-fried tuna cubes”, “Shishamo/Spirinchus lanceolatus”, “Hotate/Scallops”, “Maguro Zuke/Marinated Tuna sushi”, and “Amaebi nigiri to Shiraebi Gunkan/Sweet shrimp and white shrimp sushi”, the star of the day was “Kawahagi/Filefish”!

The chef took a splendid live specimen (see top pic) just caught off Mochimune coast in Shizuoka City out of the “aquarium” and proceeded to serve the complete fish in three different manners:


“O-Tsukuri”:
After having taken away the inedible skin, the chef first cut the fillets into very thin slices to be served with thin leeks and dip sauce made of ponzu mixed with the fresh liver of the same fish. As now is the best season, those comparatively thin fish come up with enormous livers!


“O nigiri”:
The chef managed to keep four slices aside to prepare nigiri with the fish flesh topped with a piece of its liver, some “momiji oroshi/grated daikon with chili pepper” and seasoned with ponzu!


“Kara age”:
The “cheeks bones” with their meat were last deep-fried and served as they are with some lemon. Simple and great!
All this with one single fish!

Sushi Ko
shizuoka City, Aoi Ku, Ryogae-cho. 2-3-1 (Aoba Koen)
Tel.: 054-2512898
Business Hours: 17:00~25:00. 17:00~23:00 (Sundays)
Closed on Wednesdays
Reservations recommended
Credit cards OK
HOMEPAGE (Japanese)